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  • Willagirls sell beauty products to their BFFs
  • Willagirls sell beauty products to their BFFs
    Steve Crane, Creative Commons (2011) ©
CASE STUDY

Willagirls: Gen Z sell skincare at sleepovers

From Avon ladies to Tupperware parties to Ann Summers soirees, peer-to-peer selling is an established business model for companies, with most aimed squarely at middle-aged women. But now Willa is hoping that Gen Zers can revive its brand by selling lip shimmer and face wash to their pals.

Location United States

Scope
From Avon Ladies to Tupperware parties to Ann Summers soirees, peer-to-peer selling is an established business model for companies, with most aimed squarely at middle-aged women. But now Willa is hoping that Gen Zers can revive its brand by selling lip shimmer and face wash to their pals.

By the end of 2015, the company hopes to build a network of more than 1,000 young sales representatives, selling more than $1 million in products. [1] Forget Girl Scouts selling cookies door-to-door, can Willa become the new face of Gen Z entrepreneurship?

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