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  • Can teaching people to repair things help reduce waste?
  • Can teaching people to repair things help reduce waste?
    The Restart Project (2014) ©
CASE STUDY

The Restart Project: fixing our relationship with electronics

Electrical goods are the fastest increasing waste stream in the UK, growing by 5% annually. Registered charity The Restart Project challenges our disposable conditioning, and as repair culture spreads, how realistic is it to invest in a mend rather than replace attitude?

Location United Kingdom

Scope
In today’s culture of mass production, throwing away a broken item is standard, underpinned by the array of readily available products waiting to take its place. But with electrical goods now the fastest increasing waste stream in the UK, growing by 5% annually, organisations like The Restart Project are challenging our disposable conditioning. [1] As repair culture spreads, how realistic is it to invest in a mend rather than replace attitude?

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