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  • From traditionalists to modernists, Islam is a diverse religion
  • From traditionalists to modernists, Islam is a diverse religion
    Huffington Post (2014) ©
REPORT

How are modern Muslims rewriting stereotypes?

From the fashionable Mipsterz to the ‘Happy Muslims’, the latest cultural movements in the Islamic world have been well documented across social media. With a global population of approximately 1.57 billion, what are the implications for brands trying to reach modern Muslims?

Location Northern Europe / North America

Scope
From the fashionable and fearless Mipsterz to the Happy Muslims YouTube phenomenon, the latest cultural movements in the Islamic world have been well documented across social media. But the responses from within the religion have been mixed. What are the implications for brands trying to reach modern Muslims?

For Muslims who found themselves growing up during the 9/11 years, the era of post-conflict that followed was a dark one. Frequent negative reporting of Muslims often clouded positive achievements within Islamic communities, both in the east and the west. But the growth of a global economy marks an increasing ...

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