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  • Could the way we pay affect what we buy?
  • Could the way we pay affect what we buy?
    Leo Hidalgo, Creative Commons (2015) ©
Science

Cash or credit? The science of spending

We know that seamless payments can affect how we splash out, but could they also impact how we feel about the things we’re buying? Canvas8 sat down with Dr. Avni Shah, co-author of ‘Paper or Plastic?’, to understand how the method by which we pay influences product satisfaction and brand loyalty.

Location Global

Scope
Will that be cash or card? In 2015, consumers and businesses in the UK made over 72,000 payments every minute. And while cash remains the most popular method, accounting for 45.1% of all payments last year, it’s set to be overtaken by debit cards in 2021.

We know that payment methods can affect how much cash we’re willing to part with – it’s why integrated payments are now the norm on apps like Starbucks’, and why Disney introduced RFID wristbands in its parks, helping guests forget they’re spending as they tap their funds away. But could the ...

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