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  • Millennials aren’t fans of voicemail – or even phone calls
  • Millennials aren’t fans of voicemail – or even phone calls
    The Hamster Factor, Creative Commons (2011) ©
CASE STUDY

Cord: getting people talking again

The number of teens who voice call on their phones every day dropped 50% between 2009 and 2012. Just 3% of UK Millennials now use the function daily. With texts, iMessage and WhatsApp becoming the preferred method of communication, can audio message app Cord get us talking again?

Location Global

Scope
Between 2009 and 2012, the number of teens who used their phones to actually talk every day dropped more than 50%, while a British study has found that just 3% of Millennials use voice calling for daily communications. [1][2] With text messages, iMessage and WhatsApp, mobile interactions have become focused on text- and image-based communication. In the UK, 21 billion text messages are sent a day, 50 billion messages are sent with IM, and 64 billion messages are sent through WhatsApp alone. [3][4]

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