13 Jan 2023Read of the weekRead of the week: therapeutic screaming is on the rise

Collectively, mental health is on the decline. Life stressors such as the ongoing pandemic, economic hardship and political turmoil have seen anxiety and depression increase globally. This is leading people to seek out unorthodox ways where they can vent their feelings and find a sense of release.

Author
J’Nae PhillipsJ'Nae Phillips is an Insights Editor at Canvas8. After an early career working in fashion and media, her passion for culture and journalism grew and she made the transition to writing and editing full-time. Outside of Canvas8, she can be found writing for her style-focused newsletter or adding to her growing book collection.

Modern wellness routines have seen people try everything from cannabis-aided yoga for holistic wellness to drug-free psychedelic experiences, but a new alternative form of therapy is emerging - enter the era of ‘mindful screaming’. Women seen to be the main driver behind this trend, with groups of women meeting up from all corners of the globe, from Australia to The Netherlands, to scream it out and release pent up emotions.

The impact and emotional toll of the pandemic triggered a 25% increase in the prevalence of anxiety and depression worldwide, with nearly one billion people suffering from poor mental health globally. Data has found that 1 in 5 Americans will experience a mental illness in a given year, and in the UK 1 in 6 people aged 16+ had experienced symptoms of a common mental health problem over the course of a week.

With therapy being inaccessible to many people due to high costs and long wait lists, it makes sense that people are turning to alternative coping mechanisms as a way to navigate through the many stressors of modern life. People across the UK are becoming more curious about alternative therapies and in the US a desire to take charge of their health is leading Americans to try alternative wellness treatments, with brands like Dr. Bronner's and Wavepaths meeting people's modern therapy needs.