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  • Japan takes a holistic view of seniors’ health
  • Japan takes a holistic view of seniors’ health
    Bryan Ong (2014) ©
SIGNAL

Japan takes a holistic view of seniors’ health

More than a quarter of people in Japan are over 65. Combined with an extremely low birth rate, Japan’s seniors are an increasingly dominant demographic, and numerous companies are now looking to help the country save on health costs by getting the aged to exercise both mind and body.

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