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  • Fitness trumps data privacy as health trackers boom
  • Fitness trumps data privacy as health trackers boom
    FitNish Media (2019) ©
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Fitness trumps data privacy as health trackers boom

Public concern around data sharing is growing, but that hasn’t stopped Americans from buying and using fitness trackers. In fact, research shows that one in five US adults now regularly wears a smartwatch or wearable fitness tech, suggesting that the desire to monitor health outweighs privacy fears.

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