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  • Fitbit helps health trackers keep heart rates in check
  • Fitbit helps health trackers keep heart rates in check
    @fitbit (2018) ©
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Fitbit helps health trackers keep heart rates in check

Activity tracker Fitbit has partnered with FibriCheck in order to allow wearers to track their heart rates and pick up any irregularities. Wearable health tech is growing in popularity, meeting the needs of people who want personalised and accessible ways to track and monitor their health.

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