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  • City living can affect mental health
  • City living can affect mental health
    Gustavo Gomes (2012) ©
SIGNAL

City living can affect mental health

The bright lights, the sleepless nights, the countless cultural delights. The lure of city living has spurred mass urban migration, but mounting research suggests that the metropolitan lifestyle comes with worse mental health. Can brands encourage better health among urbanites?

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