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  • Cultural values shape the smiles of our leaders
  • Cultural values shape the smiles of our leaders
    Joe Crimmings (2008) ©
SIGNAL

Cultural values shape the smiles of our leaders

As the US prepares to elect a new president, they may subconsciously be choosing the leader whose facial expressions best reflect their cultural values. A Stanford study has found a link between the values of a nation and the smiles of its business and government leaders.

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