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  • Brave is a browser that blocks ads
  • Brave is a browser that blocks ads
    nosha (2009) ©
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Brave is a browser that blocks ads

Ad-blocking has long struck terror into the hearts of marketers, sending visions of lost revenue to haunt their dreams. More and more people are turning to ad-blocking to escape unwanted ads, but a browser named Brave is now offering an almost ad-free browsing experience.

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