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  • There’s nothing stylish about ethical consumption
  • There’s nothing stylish about ethical consumption
    Everlane (2015) ©
SIGNAL

There’s nothing stylish about ethical consumption

The days when an eco-friendly lifestyle was reserved for pot-smoking, hemp-wearing hippies are long gone, right? Maybe not. New research suggests that, when it comes to clothes at least, wearing openly ethical labels not only makes you seem less stylish, but also suggests you’re a little preachy.

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