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  • Smart watches that are designed for the blind
  • Smart watches that are designed for the blind
    Dot (2015) ©
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Smart watches that are designed for the blind

The global smart watch market is predicted to be worth $32.9 billion by 2020, but what about those who can't use them? The Dot watch offers blind people a new way to get on board with smart watches. Using an active e-braille face, it looks like the start of an expanding inclusive tech industry.

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