Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • Facebook’s ‘dislike’ button isn’t what it seems
  • Facebook’s ‘dislike’ button isn’t what it seems
    Gustavo Gomes (2009) ©
SIGNAL

Facebook’s ‘dislike’ button isn’t what it seems

“People have asked about the dislike button for many years,” announced Mark Zuckerberg at an informal Facebook Q&A in September 2015. “Today is a special day, because I can say we’re working on it and shipping it.” Of course, the internet has had something to say about it.

Related

  • Article image How screenshots became the reality TV of social media

    The screenshot is how you save a digital memory. From displaying autocorrect errors to dodging Twitter’s character limit, it has become an easy and intimate way to communicate online. But what are the implications for brands? And what do they say about the users that share them?

  • Article image Is there an art to pissing people off?

    According to the world of online dating, coming across as an arse to some can make others love you more. If having haters makes those who like you like you all the more, does the same psychology apply to our relationships with brands? And does it actually pay for a brand to rub part of its audience up the wrong way?

  • Article image How emojis make digital communication more human

    With just 7% of communication being attributed to spoken words, and the remainder down to body language and tone of voice, it’s easy to see why communicating online has been described as cold and impersonal. Emoticons, emoji and stickers are helping make digital communication a bit more human.

  • Article image PopSci: a healthier information diet

    In a hyperconnected world, the ability to communicate with society at large has been democratised. But how can so much noise be filtered without impeding on freedom of speech?