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  • Sex and violence don’t always sell
  • Sex and violence don’t always sell
    Thomas S. (2009) ©
SIGNAL

Sex and violence don’t always sell

Sex and violence don’t increase sales; they could even harm them. Meta-analyses of 50 studies across several decades using a number of methodologies suggest that “programs featuring violence and sex don't provide the ideal context for effective advertising.” But it's not that black and white.

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