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  • Online thrifting digitises the thrill of discovery
  • Online thrifting digitises the thrill of discovery
    Sam Lion (2020) ©
SIGNAL

Online thrifting digitises the thrill of discovery

As store closures make it impossible for shoppers to engage in the ‘art of the hunt’, thrift store fans are going online. Vintage dealers and resale spaces are drawing people in with the thrilling experience of discovery-based shopping in the digital landscape, all from the comfort of their homes.

Canvas8

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