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  • Validating people's emotions makes them feel supported
  • Validating people's emotions makes them feel supported
    Toa Heftiba (2018) ©
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Validating people's emotions makes them feel supported

Research has revealed that validation is the most effective support for people who are stressed, compared to other verbal means. With hundreds of millions of people stressed out by COVID-19, the research offers an insight into how certain types of comms can help ease social discomfort.

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