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  • Hong Kong teens go ‘wild’ for outdoor skills course
  • Hong Kong teens go ‘wild’ for outdoor skills course
    Holly Mandarich (2017) ©
SIGNAL

Hong Kong teens go ‘wild’ for outdoor skills course

An outdoor skills course in Hong Kong is helping to reacqauint young girls with nature and prepare them to overcome educational and professional challenges. By recognising people's desire for self-improvement, brands can help by making consumers’ goals feel attainable. 

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