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  • Streaming services may have reached 'peak subscription'
  • Streaming services may have reached 'peak subscription'
    Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design (2018) ©
SIGNAL

Streaming services may have reached 'peak subscription'

A study from digital piracy firm Muso shows that European users don't want to pay any more for streaming services. In an increasingly fragmented media landscape, these findings could be a hint that people are ready to consider ad-based models in exchange for cheaper entertainment.

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