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  • World Afro Day ads celebrate natural hair
  • World Afro Day ads celebrate natural hair
    Suad Kamardeen (2018) ©
SIGNAL

World Afro Day ads celebrate natural hair

Hair bias is an issue that affects black women all over the globe, especially in professional environments. A World Afro Day ad campaign reaches out to them by celebrating afros in all their natural glory, and by challenging social attitudes that pervade much of society, which result in discrimination.

Canvas8

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