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  • Aussies welcome alternatives to reduce sugar intake
  • Aussies welcome alternatives to reduce sugar intake
    Ethan Hu (2018) ©
SIGNAL

Aussies welcome alternatives to reduce sugar intake

Research shows almost three-in-ten Australians are "very concerned" about their sugar consumption in light of increased obesity rates across the country. This presents health food brands in particular an opportunity to help educate people on how to lower their sugar intake.

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