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  • Netflix drops prestige films to cater to guilty pleasures
  • Netflix drops prestige films to cater to guilty pleasures
    CMU Klesis (2017) ©
SIGNAL

Netflix drops prestige films to cater to guilty pleasures

Netflix is beginning to shift its programming away from critically acclaimed films towards crowd-pleasing B-movies, as it caters to a growing audience of people whose favourite way of switching off is kicking back, turning on, and indulging in a guilty pleasure such as watching a cheesy film. 

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