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  • H&M slip up can't be made right with an apology
  • H&M slip up can't be made right with an apology
    Vlad Tchompalov (2017) ©
SIGNAL

H&M slip up can't be made right with an apology

After listing a jumper with the writing "Coolest Monkey in the Jungle," H&M faced a torrent of criticism. But even after two lengthy apologies, the controversy refuses to die down, showing that there are some mistakes people will struggle to forgive brands for.

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