Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • Hair Nah! satirises hair-based microaggressions
  • Hair Nah! satirises hair-based microaggressions
    Caique Silva (2017) ©
SIGNAL

Hair Nah! satirises hair-based microaggressions

For many people of colour, microaggressions like unsolicited hair touching are a common occurrence. Hair Nah! is a game that simulates these scenarios where players can fend off such attempts, in a bid to both vent grievances, while opening up a debate about social inappropriateness.

Canvas8

Related

  • Black Gen Y Americans want inclusive travel brands Black Gen Y Americans want inclusive travel brands

    A record number of Americans travelled abroad in 2016, but for many black Gen Yers, going on holiday can come with added stresses around acceptance.  Brands are stepping in to alleviate concerns for the 29% who have experienced racial discrimination in the past two years while on holiday.

  • Article image Bantu: flipping the black hair industry on its head

    For women of colour, finding a nearby stylist within a reasonable price range can seem like a near-impossible task. The Bantu app offers a solution for people seeking care for their ‘kinky, coily, and curly hair’, providing them with access to prices, available styles and reviews in their area.

  • Article image Gal-Dem: a digital zine for young women of colour

    In the digital age, being part of a minority group no longer has to mean feeling alone; a range of online platforms are letting people connect through their ethnic and cultural identities. Gal-Dem takes key talking points for young women of colour and provides a space in which they can be discussed.

  • Article image Miss Jessie‚Äôs: natural hair care for the multicultural masses

    In 2009, Good Hair laid bare the $684 million black hair care market, detailing the lengths black women go to achieve beautiful barnets. But with natural looks on the rise – 70% of black women currently wear or have worn their hair natural – are the days of chemical relaxers and $1,000 weaves over?