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  • Japanese teens feel ignored by their parents on phones
  • Japanese teens feel ignored by their parents on phones
    David (2017) ©
SIGNAL

Japanese teens feel ignored by their parents on phones

Discussions around the negative effects of smartphones tends to focus on younger generations, but a survey of teenagers in Japan reveals that they are unhappy with their parents’ behaviour too. One in five said they sometimes feel less important to their parents than their parents’ smartphones.

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