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  • Nostalgia brings people together in Japan
  • Nostalgia brings people together in Japan
    Tokyoweekender (2017) ©
SIGNAL

Nostalgia brings people together in Japan

The Shōwa period of Japanese history ended in 1989, but the legacy of retro culture it left behind has piqued modern Japan’s interest. Given nostalgia’s role in social bonding, Japan’s Shōwa fetish could help bring an increasingly estranged society closer together.  

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