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  • Hikari Labs gamifies depression treatment
  • Hikari Labs gamifies depression treatment
    Jason Ortego (2015) ©
SIGNAL

Hikari Labs gamifies depression treatment

Japan has one of the highest suicide rates in the world but people are hesitant to seek support for mental health issues. Hikari Labs sidesteps the stigma by offering cognitive behavioural therapy through a combination of online counselling and a 'self help' video game called SPARX.

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