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  • Voice interfaces are popular with less literate users
  • Voice interfaces are popular with less literate users
    Igor Ovsyannykov (2017) ©
SIGNAL

Voice interfaces are popular with less literate users

Why type when you can talk? For many people in the West, the ability to make commands to Siri or Alexa is a convenient addition to their smartphone experience. But in emerging markets, it can be integral, enabling those who can't type to get online through voice functionality.

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