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  • People who work from home are happier
  • People who work from home are happier
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People who work from home are happier

With technology making remote working an option for many, debate rages over whether having a dispersed workforce is beneficial for employees and businesses. New research from Stanford suggests it can be, leading to happier, more engaged workers who are less likely to quit.

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