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  • Britons are stream-ripping music for free
  • Britons are stream-ripping music for free
    Jiří Wagner (2017) ©
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Britons are stream-ripping music for free

The days of spending hours downloading bad quality music from The Pirate Bay and Limewire, or exchanging burned CDs with your mates are over. With entertainment increasingly shifting online, new research found that stream-ripping is the fastest-growing form of music piracy.

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