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  • Bullying does long-term damage to mental health
  • Bullying does long-term damage to mental health
    Governor Tom Wolf (2016) ©
SIGNAL

Bullying does long-term damage to mental health

Bullying might end in the playground, but its effects follow victims long into later life. As the impact of peer victimisation is recognised for its long-term damage, school systems are reinterpreting the responsibilities of guiding and educating young people.

Canvas8

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