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  • Kendall Jenner's Pepsi ad broke the internet
  • Kendall Jenner's Pepsi ad broke the internet
    Pepsi (2017) ©
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Kendall Jenner's Pepsi ad broke the internet

Who knew Kendall Jenner, a can of soda and a staged protest would be such a recipe for disaster? Certainly not Pepsi’s creative team, who are responsible for that spot. While the ad clearly missed the mark, it’s also a cautionary tale of the power of the crowd, and the tendency to revel in outrage.

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