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  • Footfall camera can identify shoppers by their shoes
  • Footfall camera can identify shoppers by their shoes
    Esther Max (2016) ©
SIGNAL

Footfall camera can identify shoppers by their shoes

Hoxton Analytics has created camera technology that tracks people’ shoes to identify the type of shoppers coming into stores. Yet while it may give retailers useful insights into their customers, tracking data without consent could be a quick way to lose their trust.

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