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  • Britons are buying Easter crackers
  • Britons are buying Easter crackers
    FotoMediamatic (2015) ©
SIGNAL

Britons are buying Easter crackers

A Christmas dinner is not complete without festive crackers. And while this tradition is entrenched in the winter holiday, Easter crackers are becoming more popular. There's no one way to celebrate an occasion anymore, and festive traditions are becoming more fluid and personalised.

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