Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • Spotify calls users out on their guilty pleasures
  • Spotify calls users out on their guilty pleasures
    Spotify (2015) ©
SIGNAL

Spotify calls users out on their guilty pleasures

Everyone’s got a guilty pleasure – whether it's a crush on Justin Bieber or a penchant for country music. And Spotify is using its swathes of data to call out users on theirs, hitting big data's sweet spot by personalising communications, without directly invading anyone's privacy.

Related

  • Article image What makes guilty pleasures so appealing?

    From playlists we hope no-one ever finds to the foods we only eat alone, everyone has at least one guilty pleasure. But does keeping quiet about one’s secret loves heighten the feel-good factor, or simply contribute to cultural snobbery? And how might brands rethink the use of guilt as an emotion?

  • Google tells people if public spaces are busy in real-time Google tells people if public spaces are busy in real-time

    Do you love the sales, but can’t bear the queues? Maybe you’re partial to a quiet drink with friends, but the thought of a bar on a Friday night leaves you feeling anxious. Google now enables people to track the busyness of public spaces in real-time, so they can make their plans accordingly.

  • Article image What's the point of billboards?

    In a splintered media landscape – where we’re flitting from device to device, bombarded by 360 ads a day – Out of Home advertising remains a constant. After all, you can’t skip a billboard. But that doesn’t mean people like them, either. So what does the future hold for the billboard?

  • Capital One uses shopping history for good Capital One uses shopping history for good

    Everyone loves a bargain; UK discount stores are worth £7.5 billion, while in the US, flash sales site Zulily has amassed more than $1 billion in revenue. Now, credit card provider Capital One is making it even easier for customers to get a good deal – provided they're comfortable with data mining.