Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • India’s cash crash is hitting women the hardest
  • India’s cash crash is hitting women the hardest
    Garry Knight (2014) ©
SIGNAL

India’s cash crash is hitting women the hardest

India has demonetised its largest banknotes in a bid to rid itself of the ‘black money’ that was enabling large-scale tax evasion. But the surprise move hasn't affected the population equally; women, who have been largely excluded from the formal banking industry, are being hit the hardest.

Canvas8

Related

  • Article image A Cultural Snapshot of India

    Why are Indian families shrinking? What’s to become of the tradition of the home-cooked family meal? And how are Dalits fighting against age-old inequalities? This Cultural Snapshot uses local statistics and case studies to explore behavioural norms shared by Indian people in 2016.

  • Uber is cashing in on Indian weddings Uber is cashing in on Indian weddings

    The big fat Indian wedding market is worth $15 billion, but excitement over the impending season has been dampened by a shortage of cash due to the demonetisation of large notes. Uber is capitalising by launching its Uberweddings service, letting people begin planning cash-free.

  • India ready to say goodbye to cash India ready to say goodbye to cash

    Cash is king in India, where many people use their debit cards solely to withdraw money from ATMs. But mobile commerce is taking off, with e-commerce giants Amazon and Alibaba driving an increasing openness to e-payments and internet banking by introducing mobile payment systems.

  • Article image Why Indians will put anything on credit

    India was once a cash economy governed by middle-class values. If you didn’t have it, you didn’t spend it. Thanks to credit cards and a young generation that expect the finest things in life, India has a debt problem. But what opportunities can ‘putting it on credit’ bring?