Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • People are bragging about being overworked online
  • People are bragging about being overworked online
    FotoMediamatic (2015) ©
SIGNAL

People are bragging about being overworked online

Have you ever complained you’re still slaving over your laptop at 8pm? Or posted a pre-office hours desk shot to Instagram with a grumbling caption? In a society that worships productivity, people are using social media to transform the pressure of their labours into an opportunity to humblebrag.

Related

  • Article image Why homes and offices are starting to look alike

    Major apps are being redesigned to create a unified mobile experience – and a similar process is taking place in the physical world too. In the second of a two-part report, Canvas8 looks at how the Airspace aesthetic is blending work, home and leisure environments from Sydney to Silicon Valley.

  • Article image Ambitious Hours: WSJ appeals to readers with ambition

    The success of ad campaigns is often measured by how many people see them. But The Wall Street Journal’s ‘Ambitious Hours’ campaign took a different route, exclusively targeting people with specific lifestyle choices – meaning the only people who saw it were the people that mattered.


  • Article image Bossy: dictating your procrastination

    From BuzzFeed to Facebook to the Mail Online, few will argue that, with its advanced 'Related Articles’ algorithms and adorable memes, the internet is capable of sucking people in for hours at a time. Now, London-based design student Lucas Neumann thinks he's found a way out.

  • Article image Is work the new religion?

    As having a strong work ethic is increasingly valued and respected, being hard-working no longer means you’re a geek. On the contrary, it's becoming a preferable lifestyle choice.