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  • Toyota has made 100,000 versions of its ad
  • Toyota has made 100,000 versions of its ad
    Toyota USA (2016) ©
SIGNAL

Toyota has made 100,000 versions of its ad

Toyota’s newest ad can play out in a number of different ways depending on what kind of person is watching. With personalised products increasingly expected from brands, the carmaker is pushing to make a generic SUV seem tailored to individual tastes.

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