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  • Chatbots don’t understand social cues
  • Chatbots don’t understand social cues
    Microsoft (2016) ©
SIGNAL

Chatbots don’t understand social cues

Robots in group chats are making awkward comments, bringing up the question of how to teach a bot the art of discretion. Although developers are working on the issue, the shortcomings of AI in social situations resonate with a wider public scepticism of non-human service.

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