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  • Japan's Gen Xers and Boomers are anxious about ageing
  • Japan's Gen Xers and Boomers are anxious about ageing
    Aikawa Ke (2015) ©
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Japan's Gen Xers and Boomers are anxious about ageing

Growing old is daunting, but imagine having to grow old alone. In Japan, four in five 40- to 59-year-olds have expressed anxiety about feeling lonely in later life, with over three-quarters worried about becoming ill without having the appropriate care.

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