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  • Open plan offices are making Aussie workers unfriendly
  • Open plan offices are making Aussie workers unfriendly
    Lawrence Sinclair (2016) ©
SIGNAL

Open plan offices are making Aussie workers unfriendly

Open plan offices were originally intended to increase collaboration and improve relationships in the workplace. Yet a recent survey has revealed that Australian workers in these settings are more unfriendly, uncollaborative and distracted than employees in traditional work spaces.

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