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  • German airline Condor allows extra book baggage
  • German airline Condor allows extra book baggage
    Daniel Hoherd (2011) ©
SIGNAL

German airline Condor allows extra book baggage

Fighting for that one kilogram of overweight baggage at the check-in desk is no longer an issue for German bookworms. With Condor’s ‘Book on Board’ campaign, travellers are being given an extra kilo of luggage allowance to pack their favourite books for the holiday season.

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