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  • Chinese consumers get a taste for museums
  • Chinese consumers get a taste for museums
    Noah Berger (2014) ©
SIGNAL

Chinese consumers get a taste for museums

With the success of Chinese art sensations like Ai Weiwei and record-breaking sales at Art Basel Hong Kong, China’s art market has captured global attention. And now, London’s Victoria & Albert Museum will be the first international institution to make a permanent home in the country.

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