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  • What protesters look for in a social platform
  • What protesters look for in a social platform
    Sean P. Anderson (2011) ©
SIGNAL

What protesters look for in a social platform

After a spate of police brutality incidents in the US, Facebook’s reaction was worryingly non-committal, despite being a key medium for raising awareness. Around 70% of young people believe social media can be a force for good, but some channels are better suited to social change than others.

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