Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • World Bicycle Relief helps kids get to school
  • World Bicycle Relief helps kids get to school
    World Bicycle Relief (2016) ©
SIGNAL

World Bicycle Relief helps kids get to school

Imagine having to walk four miles through valleys, bushes, and barbed wire just to get to school. This is a reality for many children in Kenya, where travel is only one of several obstacles to getting an education. But one company is lessening the burden by providing bicycles to kids.

Related

  • Article image Free Basics: making the internet accessible to all

    If the internet were a country, it would be the fifth largest economy all on its own, but just 43% of people have access to it. Since 2013, Facebook has been working alongside names including Samsung and Qualcomm to fix this. But could making the internet accessible to all really be so simple?

  • Article image Pindex: curating your education experience

    With a culture of self-improvement established in the mainstream, Stephen Fry’s new tech start-up Pindex aims to be a ‘Pinterest for education’. Can this invitation-only service emulate the success of TED and make learning an awe-inspiring experience for both students and teachers?

  • A charity is campaigning for standing desks in US schools A charity is campaigning for standing desks in US schools

    Standing desks began as an edgy thing for health nuts who were desperate to tell you about their CrossFit routines and paleo diets. But as more research has emerged about the benefits of standing, and the detrimental effects of sitting, they have begun trickling down to the average cubicle drone.

  • Malls changing shopping habits in Africa Malls changing shopping habits in Africa

    Across Sub-Saharan Africa, the traditional outdoor markets and street vendors that sell everything from avocados to sacks of maize are being replaced by malls. It's being driven by the expansion of South African retailers and is radically altering the way the middle classes shop.