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  • Therapists could track mental health on social
  • Therapists could track mental health on social
    Christian Schirrmacher (2016) ©
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Therapists could track mental health on social

Declarations on social media can range from shout outs to commentary on pop culture. Some people’s posts, however, can be telling of their mental state. In light of this, UCLA professor Sean Young hopes to one day implement a system which uses social data to monitor signs of mental illness.

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