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  • Young Chinese want digital goods for status
  • Young Chinese want digital goods for status
    Philippe Put (2015) ©
SIGNAL

Young Chinese want digital goods for status

Status is everything in China. But forget the flash cars, luxury designer bags and huge mansions. In a society that's going increasingly digital, the new social currency comes in the form of technology products, which help the elite show off their wealth to the masses.

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