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  • Americans see breakfast as a snack
  • Americans see breakfast as a snack
    Daniel Pietzsch (2011) ©
SIGNAL

Americans see breakfast as a snack

Parents always told us that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. But for many Americans – particularly younger generations – it's practically lost its status as a proper meal, with almost a quarter (24%) rejecting a full morning meal, opting for a snack instead.

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