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  • The New Day fails to draw readers back to print
  • The New Day fails to draw readers back to print
    Garry Knight (2010) ©
SIGNAL

The New Day fails to draw readers back to print

The New Day, Britain’s first standalone newspaper to open in 30 years, will be closing in May 2016. Serving content optimised for speed-reading, it was supposed to be a ray of sunshine amid general gloom in the industry. But just ten weeks after launching, it became clear there was no audience.

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